Automatic Coloring of Maps

Maps With Contiguous Regions

Maps often present a geographic area that is divided into regions that butt against one another.

Examples of maps that have contiguous regions include a countries divided into states and cities showing different types of zoning classifications.

By contrast, a map showing parks would not be a good example because different parks often do not adjacent to one another - there is often some other type of land between parks.

The most common way of presenting these maps is to color the regions such that no two adjacent regions have the same color.

Four Color Theorem

If you're into mapping, you most probably aware of the Four color theorem which states that no more than four colors are required to color the regions of a map containing contiguous regions such that no two adjacent regions have the same color. This theorem is surprisingly difficult to prove and implement in a computer program.

Maprosoft Solution

Maprosoft takes the tedium out of manually specifying regional colors by implementing a fast algorithm to automatically color regions using a palette comprised of the following colors:

                   

The Maprosoft coloring algorithm can be applied to any number of feature types.